Four photos show a woman reading, a mother hugging her child, a successful business meeting and a man working out. These are all ways to connect the dots.

Fortune magazine released their 40 Under 40 list recently with a diverse list ranging in race, gender, nationality, and industry. Notable influencers that were given the honor include filmmakers like Jordan Peele, who was the first black screenwriter to win an Oscar in the screenplay category in 2018, and Executives like Dhivya Suryadevara, 39, who was the first female Chief Financial Officer of GM. What makes these visionaries amazing isn’t their skin color or gender. Instead, they are being celebrated for the obstacles they have had to overcome. Below is wisdom from another thought leader, who has empowered over 50 million people from 100 countries through his work. Tony Robbins has a roadmap to almost every subject area relevant to CEOs, artists, executives, and more. Below are pieces of advice from Tony that could help inspire you to become as influential as Jordan Peele or Dhivya Suryadevara in your circles.

Take Care of Your Body and Mind

Tony recommends reading 30 minutes a day to boost mental growth. But he doesn’t suggest reading only your favorite graphic novel or romantic fiction. Instead, he wants you to read something that will make you think critically. In his own words, “Scrolling through social media doesn’t count.”

Don’t just exercise your brain. Get your heart pumping, too! He suggests, at a minimum, exercising 5 days a week with your heart racing for 10 minutes. What you do to get your body moving is up to you, and be sure to consult with a doctor if you have any health concerns. Combining physical and mental exercise will go hand in hand in your personal development.

Expand Your Sphere

You may find yourself tempted to lower your self-worth by associating with people you think are at your level or lower because they are comfortable to you. But this won’t help you grow. Find people who have what you want, and associate with them. It’s up to you whether this means a casual “hello” and slowly building up to more small talk, or straight up asking them for their advice on your mutual fields. As Tony says, “if you play someone at your level or below, you never stretch yourself. No stretch, no improvement….Yes, staying in an environment where you feel like you’re not good enough can be tough, but hold on – it’ll pay off in the long run.”

In Giving We Receive

Try to help someone every week for 2–3 minutes, or break it into 10 minutes per month. It’s that simple. Tony recommends providing food, conversation, or your problem-solving skills. You could also try to be kind when you’re stuck in traffic. For example, let cars into your lane when they need to change lanes. Or return the grocery cart for the elderly person who cannot return it. Tony’s “secret to living is giving. It’s truly the secret for how to feel happy.”

The power of now when overwhelmed in business and life

At some point or another, most people have felt completely overwhelmed in their business and personal lives. It is completely normal and human to feel disoriented and completely alone in the face of a setback, yet it remains uniquely devastating for each individual who faces failure and loss. Even though you know everyone goes through similar challenges, for you it is happening on a grand stage and is monumental in scope and duration.

It will not take much imagination to think back to a time you felt this way. For most people, it is something that can be recalled in vivid detail, as if a camera has recorded every nuance of light and language. Though it can’t possibly be true, it seems like it often happens on a dark, rainy day. Or maybe that’s just how the soul feels.

Taking Personal Inventory

There are, of course, dozens of ways to respond to business and personal destruction and trauma. One imperative step to take is to take a personal inventory. Where has your energy been leading up to the failure? Have you been grasping at things you can’t change such as rethinking the past or putting all your energy into some future hope or goal? Maybe you are not being present enough in your business efforts or your personal relationships? Maybe both.

Eckhart Tolle’s “The Power of Now” talks about committing to the present moment, to spend less time looking back and projecting forward. The author urges you to commit to the moment that is in front of you.

For those in business, there are opportunities lost by not being present. Every time you are lost in a past conversation or challenge other than the one that is right in front of you, there is a possibility you are going to miss something important. You need to have keen, piercing vision, and every single piece of missed information, or dropped data, is going to weaken your vision. Anything that goes unseen might just make it impossible to succeed.

Getting punched in the face is part of what happens when you take on big challenges, but you would never walk into a boxing ring thinking about your last failure. You have to be totally present and alive to see the punches coming in order to know when to defend and when to strike.

What Does It Mean To Be a Human Being?

Think about what it means to be a human being. You come into this world naked with nothing, and you leave it the same way. Tolle says the secret of life is to “die before you die.” 

It is imperative to become aware of who you are in any given moment. You have to awaken to your subconscious responses to any given situation, and then to let go of them. When you become aware of your emotional responses, you acknowledge them without letting them make decisions for you. You miss critical things when you don’t.

“Be at least as interested in what goes on inside you as what happens outside. If you get the inside right, the outside will fall into place,” says Tolle. Even if it is raining outside, it doesn’t have to cloud your mind, your soul and your decisions.

The way to be a true entrepreneur is to be open, honest, and vulnerable in the moment right in front of you. Energized, aware, and alive, you live in the moment, in the now. Then, all of your personal and business growth can happen organically, steadily and slowly from that place.

So be humble and open to learning every day. Surround yourself with people willing to be challenged, who are authentic and open and alive. And build ways to make the lives of your clients, employees, friends, and family better. Step into the now.

Labor day celebrates workers end of summer

For most Americans, Labor Day marks the unofficial end of summer. Parents send their kids back to school and stow the camping gear away. Everyone knows that autumn is on the way.


But Labor Day, the first Monday in September, was not a three day weekend when President Grover Cleveland signed the holiday into law in 1894. It marked the culmination of a contentious, blood stained struggle between a railroad owner and his unionized employees.

The Pullman Strike

Though the history is somewhat unclear, it appears Americans first celebrated Labor Day in New York City in 1882. Workers held a parade, of sorts, marching through lower Manhattan along Broadway. Two hundred members of the Jewelers Union started a trickle that became a deluge of between 10,000 and 20,000 working men and women. They marched to Reservoir Park. Instead of going back to work, as planned, they proceeded to have a party. Reservoir Park overflowed with 25,000 people and “beer kegs mounted in every conceivable place.”

By the end of the decade, nine states had joined the party and established Labor Day as a celebration of the working class. Unfortunately, a  disastrous economic depression hit the country in 1890, hitting the Pullman Company, maker of luxurious rail cars, as hard as anyone. Pullman lowered the wages it paid its workers by 30 percent.

According a recent Business Insider article, the workers lived in company-owned buildings, and shopped at company-owned stores. Industrialist George Pullman felt like he gave his workers a sanitary, safe place to live and would not, despite the pay reduction, lower the rent or decrease the prices of goods in his stores. This incensed the workers.

In May of 1894, the workers went on strike and, though it appears that the public was moved in sympathy of the strikers, Pullman was not. Instead of meeting to negotiate, he hired strikebreakers. The strike spread to include all Chicago trains, virtually stopping train traffic. The government sent in soldiers and the violence escalated. The final toll: millions of dollars in damage and 30 lives lost.

Cleveland crushes strike, celebrates Labor Day

President Cleveland “signed the bill into law just days after federal troops brought down the bloody Pullman strike.” It may have been a public relations move meant to appease Cleveland’s constituents. Cleveland, a Democrat, was supposedly a representative of labor. According to many, he badly mishandled the situation by authorizing federal military action that made the violent struggle bloodier.

As you can see, at first Labor Day was a party. Then it was a bloody struggle. And, finally, now, it is the muted last fling of summer, a day with a great deal of history but little fanfare.