Three green text bubbles on the left, to symbolize positive reviews, next to three red text bubbles to imitate negative reviews.

Getting positive reviews going may take a while, because people are really only likely to publish a good review if the service was particularly spectacular. But if given some sort of prompting, like a verbal asking of “hey, would you mind leaving a good review for the store later on if you have a chance?” or a reminder on a receipt can go a long way. When a review page starts getting those glowing reviews going, it’s something worth being proud of and even sharing with the business’ employees.

But, inevitably, not everyone is going to be happy with the services they receive. Upset customers are over 50% more likely to leave a negative review. If a business on average has more positive interactions with customers, the concern over negative reviews can be mitigated. It may not feel great to have a negative review left, but as a business grows it’s bound to happen.

What’s a problem, though, is fraudulent reviews. Customers that are upset for reasons probably way beyond what happened with a company may not just leave one negative, but several, some of which may be made up. Or, petty competition may throw up some bad reviews to make themselves look better. Getting rid of fraudulent reviews isn’t always easy, but there are ways to go about it. Reporting those fraudulent reviews is usually the way to go about that, but there will have to be sufficient evidence that the review is fake so there’s no “he said/she said”.

Whatever comes a business’ way, it’s important to look towards the future, and work hard. That positive attitude will transfer over into better customer interactions, until even a few bad reviews can’t dim the shine of the tons of positive reviews a business might someday have.

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